Link between fast food and asthma discovered



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Study: Regular consumption of fast food can lead to asthma in children.

According to a study by the University of Ulm, asthma diseases occur significantly more often when children consume fast food products several times a week. However, the scientists point out that the consumption of fast food such as hamburgers or sugary cola is not a direct reason for the development of asthma. Rather, the study gives an indication that a "large bundle" of nutritional and lifestyle habits favor the development of asthma.

In the course of the study, data from 50,000 children aged 8 to 12 years from twenty different countries were evaluated. The parents should use a questionnaire to describe what their children eat and whether the child has asthma symptoms. The scientists report that the diet has no influence on allergies caused by pollen, for example. Nevertheless, there is a connection between eating habits and asthma diseases or severe wheezing. Children who ate fruit and vegetables more often suffered less from chronic respiratory disease. Children de eating hamburgers several times a week were much more likely to develop asthma. In low-income countries, however, the incidence of asthma is not significantly higher, even if the child eats fast food more often during the week. According to the WHO, approximately 300 million people around the world suffer from asthma. The disease is the most common chronic disease in children. Around 250,000 people die of the disease every year. (sb)

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Image: Rainer Sturm /Pixelio.de

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